Diabetes Nutrition

1419 words 6 pages
Diabetes Nutrition Having diabetes means thinking differently about food and nutrition. This can seem challenging sometimes, but it becomes a bit more manageable once you learn the facts. There are several forms of diabetes. Diabetes can occur at any age. Insulin is a hormone produced by special cells, called beta cells, in the pancreas, an organ located in the area behind your stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells, where it is stored and later used for energy. In pt. with diabetes, these cells produce little or no insulin. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of going into the cells. The body is unable to use this glucose for energy. This leads to an increase in Blood …show more content…
Now you have 3 sections, 2 small and 1 large. Try to fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetable such as spinach, carrots, lettuce, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes or cukes. In a small section should be your starchy food such as whole grain bread, rice, pasta, peas, potatoes, corn, lima beans, lowfat chips or pretzels. In the other small section place low fat meat such as deck of cards size piece of chicken, tuna, salmon, cod, lean beef, or pork, or go with high protein meat substitutes such as tofu, eggs or low fat cheese. Also add a lowfat drink and piece of fruit for dessert. Getting in this habit of organizing your meals can help make healthful eating easier. The most fundamental component of the diabetes treatment plan for all patients with type II diabetes is medical nutrition therapy. Specific goals of nutrition therapy in type II diabetes are to Achieve and maintain as near-normal blood glucose levels as possible by balancing food intake with physical activity, supplemented by oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin as needed. Help patients attain and maintain a reasonable body weight. Promote overall health through optimal nutrition and lifestyle behaviors. Because no single dietary approach is appropriate for all patients, meal plans and diet modifications should be individualized to meet a patient's unique needs and lifestyle. Accordingly, any nutrition intervention should be based on a thorough

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