Lifeguard and Victim

9072 words 37 pages
Chapter 5

Rescue Skills

A lifeguard must always be prepared to enter the water to make rescues. After determining that the victim needs help, the lifeguard should assess the victim’s condition and use an appropriate rescue. The skills in this chapter can be used in most aquatic environments, although they may have to be modified in some situations.

58

Lifeguarding

GENERAL PROCEDURES
FOR A WATER EMERGENCY

6. Provides emergency care as needed. Depending upon

In all rescue situations, the lifeguard recognizes an emergency in the water, activates the emergency action plan
(EAP) (Fig. 5-1), uses rescue equipment and follows these general procedures:

LIFEGUARDING TIP: A lifeguard must always provide for his or her own safety and the
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Squeeze the rescue tube high against the chest with the tube under the armpits (Fig. 5-7, A).
2. Hold the excess line to keep it from getting caught in the lifeguard chair or other equipment when jumping into the water.
3. Leap into the water with one leg forward and the other leg back (Fig. 5-7, B).
4. Lean slightly forward, with the chest ahead of the hips, and focus on the victim when entering the water.
5. Squeeze or scissor the legs together for upward thrust
(Fig. 5-7, C).
6. Focus on the victim and begin the approach
(Fig. 5-7, D).

C

D

Rescue Skills

Compact Jump
A lifeguard should use the compact jump when more than
3 feet above the water, such as on a lifeguard stand or pier, but only if the water is at least 5 feet deep. The compact jump can also be done from a pool deck into the water. To perform a compact jump, the lifeguard should—
1. Squeeze the rescue tube high against the chest with the tube under the armpits.
2. Hold the excess line to keep it from getting caught in the lifeguard chair or other equipment when jumping into the water (Fig. 5-8, A).

3. Jump out and away from the lifeguard chair, pool deck or pier (Fig. 5-8, B). In a wave pool, time the jump to land on the crest (top) of a wave (Fig. 5-8, C).
4. Bend the knees and keep the feet together and flat to

absorb the shock if hitting the bottom. Do not point the toes or keep the legs straight or stiff.
5. Let the buoyancy of the rescue tube bring the

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