Andrew Jackson's Leadership in the Battle of New Orleans

1100 words 5 pages
Shayne A. Charles
History 485-01 “Andrew Jackson, The Battle of New Orleans”

Andrew Jackson was born in rural South Carolina March 15, 1767, the son of impoverished Irish immigrants. He received no formal education as young child and became a messenger boy in the American Revolution at the age of 13. At the Age of 35, he was elected to the Tennessee Militia as a Major General.(LOC) The Battle of New Orleans took place on January 8, 1815 and was the final major battle of the War of 1812. In this decisive battle of the American Revolution, the American forces were led by Andrew Jackson. After this victory, Jackson emerged as a hero for his actions. Andrew Jackson was an aggressive leader, he knew his intentions, and
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He waited patiently when he had to and attacked when needed. The performance of his American troops was pretty good considering that they had never fought as a complete unit before and many were inexperienced. Andrew Jackson was so effective that he convinced a man to be a spy. He placed detachments strategically to combat the British assault and if that line were breached, then there was another to greet the British unexpectedly. He always wanted better from his men because who could not imagine being beat by the British. Jackson always was very much visible to his men. He was constantly reviewing his men and lifting their moral by showing them a sense of pride and letting them know their purpose for what they are doing. There was more a stake than just fighting the British and that this was a smaller part of a bigger picture. This continued through out the war until it was over. The American casualties were minimal compared to those of the British. Andrew Jackson’s men were taught discipline with their ammunition since they didn’t have much and were totally outnumbered by the British. This proved to be effective and sustained them during the war. The British failed because they underestimated Jackson and was unable to overcome the

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