Hamlet's Loss of Faith

1326 words 6 pages
There comes a time in one’s life when he loses faith in his beliefs or in his relationships. In Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet, Hamlet’s uncle Claudius, murders Hamlet’s father to inherit the crown of Denmark and the love of Hamlet’s mother, Gertrude. Throughout the play there are six soliloquies that reveal the character of Hamlet and others. In more than any other Shakespearean play, the audience is painted a better picture of Hamlet’s mind. Shakespeare questions the social and Christian institutions in the face of tragedy with the usage of several ambiguous phrases. Through word play and tone shifts, Hamlet’s collapsing sanity is reflected and shows the deconstruction of his views towards the Church and its values and his family. Hamlet’s …show more content…
Life is pointless to Hamlet, and with overwhelming feelings of suicide, he questions “how [weary], stale, flat, and unprofitable [are]

the uses of this world” (I.ii.133-134)! Through the use of stressed syllables and myopia, Hamlet exemplifies his feelings of disgust, anger, sorrow, and grief by believing that the world is useless. Feeling this way, Hamlet wishes to move away from such a world. Hamlet wants to end his life not only because he is in pain, but also because his trust in his family is beginning to collapse. Hamlet’s trust in his family is completely gone as his sanity begins to dissolve. This is a result of the betrayal from both Claudius and Gertrude towards King Hamlet. With a deceased father and sick uncle, Hamlet is unable to accept the fact that a family member would intentionally hurt another for superficial reasons. Hamlet describes his new stepfather as "a little more than kin, and less than kind" (I.ii.65). In Hamlet’s eyes, Claudius is more than kin because he is Hamlet’s stepfather and uncle, but less than kind, which takes on several meanings. Through the use of a pun, Shakespeare implies that “kind” could mean “ancestral shock” or “having considerate nature.” It is quite ironic because Claudius does have not have a tight bond or kinship with Hamlet, nor is he “kind” for murdering his brother. Not only does he call into question

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