Thomas Paine's Beliefs

1468 words 6 pages
Toby Glover
Engl.2110W02
Midterm S11
Foltz-Gray D. The Native American effect It is clear that throughout many years there has been an exemption of treatment when talking about the Native Americans in the United States. Supposedly every individual is endowed with the right of freedom, equality, and of seeking for happiness, but Native Americans were treated irrationally. From the discovery of America, to the founding fathers and settlers, the treatment and attitude towards Native Americans has been unsettling at best. The colonial policies toward the Native Americans affected the Indians in ways that changed their relationship between their tribes and the new nation. Cabeza de Vaca, Roger Williams, Cotton Mather, and Benjamin
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“Savages we call them, because their manners differ from ours, which we think the perfection of civility; they think the same of theirs” (Franklin The Norton Anthology American Lit. p.468). He suggests that the Native Americans should not have been treated so badly because they did not practice the same civility as others. Ben Franklin also thought that the Native Americans should have been welcomed instead of made fun and treated like circus clowns. He also treated them in a favorable light by opening his mind to their culture. In all these four men had varying views of the Native Americans, some similar and some indifferent. The belief system and cultures of these men were very eclectic ultimately shaping their outlooks.

Thomas Paine’s Beliefs The issue of Faith versus Reason and the relationship between them has been discussed throughout civilization. A prime figure in this discussion during the recent past, the mid 18’Th to the early 19’Th centuries, was Thomas Paine. Paine’s writings during both the United States and French revolutions helped to spearhead the respective countries into revolution and eventually freedom. As such, Paine is certainly seen as an influential figure during this time period for practical reasons. But Paine is equally important because of the way in which he

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