Fight Club: Analysis of Novel and Film

1546 words 7 pages
Fight Club: Analysis of Novel and film
Fight Club is a potent, diabolically sharp, and nerve chafing satire that was beautifully written by Chuck Palahniuk and adapted to the silver screen by David Fincher. A story masterfully brought together by mischief, mayhem, and ironically, soap. Fight Club is the definition of a cult classic because the issues dealt within the novel touched so close to home to the generation this novel was intended for, generation X. The novel was written in 1996 and quickly made it to the silver screen in 1999. The novel and film are remarkably similar, but at the same time focus on different themes. The character and plot of both the novel and movie are also very much the same, but in ways different.
Theme is
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He is more there to balance Tyler Durden out. The narrator becomes friends with Tyler, starts fight club with him, and even abandons some of his old materialistic ways, but still resents the fact his condo was destroyed. He doesn’t actually accept the fact that self destruction of everyone is enlightenment, even though he slowly destroys himself.
Tyler Durden is everything the narrator wants to be in both the book and film. He is the alpha male in the narrator’s eyes, but he is more realistic in the novel than the movie. In the novel, Tyler seems more realistic in the novel than in the film, novel version of Tyler owns his own business, rents his own house and has an outside life the narrator is unaware of, but in the film he seems more a part of the narrator’s mind than an actual person.
Fincher’s version of Fight Club does a remarkable job portraying the visionary story Palahniuk based his career around. Both versions of the story, book and film, have the same basic ideas, characters, and even dialogue, but both also focus the plot around different aspects of the story.
The film version of Fight Club likes to revolve the story around the actually fight club itself. Most of the movie takes place in the basement of bars, with shirtless men brutally destroying each other, cheering, and smashing each other’s faces into to the concrete with a cold, packing thud on every slam.

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