Crimes and Misdemeanors

1795 words 8 pages
Cheryl Brown
Professor Nassif
Intro to Philosophy
17 Nov 2012
“Crimes and Misdemeanors” In the final scene when Louis Levy speaks of the capacity of love I feel he is saying that we as humans have this natural need for an emotional attachment in order to feel complete as a person. Everyone on this earth is looking for love and acceptance and this starts from birth. A baby requires love, attention, physical touch and maternal nurturing along with biological needs in order to survive. This is carried on throughout out a person’s life. If one can look back as far as possible into their childhood they will come to find that love from another being is essential to growth because this will be the basis of what kind of adult you will grow
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Her love for Judah is so clingy and needy. She has invested two years of her life in this relationship and she is so desperate to keep him that she is willing to destroy his marriage to his wife Miriam and destroy his reputation as a doctor in order to do so. Judah on the other hand loves Delores but is not willing to give up his marriage and life of comfort for her and feels he is in a holds bar with Delores. Judah speaks with his brother Jack on this matter and contemplates murder with which Jack suggests so that Judah can get back to his normal life. Jack tries to make Judah see that there is a simple solution to his problem, that by ending Delores’ life is the only way for Judah to get back to the previous life he had before he met her and this can be seen as a John Stuart Mill way of thinking; the purpose of human beings is happiness, pleasure in the absence of pain, that "actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.”(sparknotes.com).So inevitably, Judah decides to take his brother’s advice and has the problem with Delores “taken care of.” Sartre can also be seen in this movie because he speaks of humans taking responsibility for their own actions and that one is responsible for what is made of one. In other words; man makes himself. This can be true of Judah. Judah made the situation he was in and therefore, regardless if he did not actually murder

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