Analysis of Main Character in Animal Farm

1034 words 5 pages
Analysis of Major Characters

Napoleon

From the very beginning of the novella, Napoleon emerges as an utterly corrupt opportunist. Though always present at the early meetings of the new state, Napoleon never makes a single contribution to the revolution—not to the formulation of its ideology, not to the bloody struggle that it necessitates, not to the new society’s initial attempts to establish itself. He never shows interest in the strength of Animal Farm itself, only in the strength of his power over it. Thus, the only project he undertakes with enthusiasm is the training of a litter of puppies. He doesn’t educate them for their own good or for the good of all, however, but rather for his own good: they become his own private army or
…show more content…
It may also, however, speak to the specific significance of Boxer himself: before being carted off, he serves as the force that holds Animal Farm together.

Squealer

Throughout his career, Orwell explored how politicians manipulate language in an age of mass media. In Animal Farm, the silver-tongued pig Squealer abuses language to justify Napoleon’s actions and policies to the proletariat by whatever means seem necessary. By radically simplifying language—as when he teaches the sheep to bleat “Four legs good, two legs better!”—he limits the terms of debate. By complicating language unnecessarily, he confuses and intimidates the uneducated, as when he explains that pigs, who are the “brainworkers” of the farm, consume milk and apples not for pleasure, but for the good of their comrades. In this latter strategy, he also employs jargon (“tactics, tactics”) as well as a baffling vocabulary of false and impenetrable statistics, engendering in the other animals both self-doubt and a sense of hopelessness about ever accessing the truth without the pigs’ mediation. Squealer’s lack of conscience and unwavering loyalty to his leader, alongside his rhetorical skills, make him the perfect propagandist for any tyranny. Squealer’s name also fits him well: squealing, of course, refers to a pig’s typical form of vocalization, and Squealer’s speech defines him. At the same time, to squeal also means to betray, aptly evoking Squealer’s behavior with

Related

  • Notions of Power: Animal Farm and Macbeth
    1272 words | 6 pages
  • Chapter 1 Questions and Answers, Animal Farm
    894 words | 4 pages
  • "Crash" Character Analysis
    2447 words | 10 pages
  • Animal Farm CD Project Album
    4417 words | 18 pages
  • Animal Farm - Character Analysis- Boxer the Horse
    1277 words | 6 pages
  • Character Analysis: Catherine in "Proof"
    4221 words | 17 pages
  • Character Analysis of Water for Elephant
    986 words | 4 pages
  • Winston Smith Character Analysis
    1766 words | 8 pages
  • Animal Cruelty on Factory Farms
    1849 words | 8 pages
  • Book Report on George Orwell's Animal Farm
    4567 words | 19 pages